Podcast Love: 2005-2006

Podcast Love: 2005-2006

I love podcasts, and have since I first started listening to them in 2005. Since then, they’ve always been a part of my life: company on long car rides, while walking the dogs, or just sitting at home knitting. Some podcasts, I can even remember exactly when and where I was when I listened to a specific episode. This is a multi-part series on podcasts I love, past and present.

Circa 2005-2006
I first discovered podcasts as a college student, when my mom sent me a magazine (Real Simple, maybe?) that happened to have a tiny 1/2 page feature about podcasts. I was intrigued, and started exploring. It took a bit of trial and error to find podcasts I really enjoyed, but back then, there were few enough podcasts that it was (almost) possible to listen to them all.

In 2005, you had to download a separate podcast aggregator, and then manually load them into iTunes (it was huge when iTunes opened up it’s podcast directory!), and from there, onto your iPod (at that time, I had one of the bulky early gen iPods with a click wheel). I was always running out of hard drive space in those days, and had to be careful to delete the files twice: once, after I copied them from the aggregator to iTunes, and then again after I listened to them.

The Dragon Page: Cover to Cover
News and interviews with sci-fi and fantasy authors–in 2005 when I discovered Cover to Cover, it was hosted by Michael R Mennenga and Evo Terra (who went on to create podiobooks.com). The Dragon Page spawned Farpoint Media, which of course is still known for the Parsec Awards. Several huge authors came to my attention because of Cover to Cover–in particular, I remember walking our family dog Rosie one night on a visit home from college and listening to an interview with an author who had just released his first book: Elantris. Of course, Cover to Cover also brought me to several Big Name Authors in the podcast fiction community such as Mur Lafferty, Scott Sigler, and JC Hutchins. In later years, Mike Mennenga was joined by Michael A Stackpole, and focus shifted to publishing trends and news, ebooks, and general writing advice.

I was going to put this one in the “sadly podfaded” category, (though there are over 400 archived episodes available) but actually, I just went to the Dragon Page site to see when the last episode was, and there are several new episodes in 2014. Re-added!

Cast On
One of the Big Momma podcasts of the now-expansive knitting podcast community. Cast On was one of the very first knitting podcasts, and I suspect a large reason why there is such a great community of knitting podcasts today. Hosted by Brenda Dayne, an expat American living in Wales, Cast On has great production values and really high quality content and essays. One great thing about Cast On is that early on, Brenda decided to structure Cast On into “series” (British use of the word) with a handful of episodes–often thematically linked–followed by a brief (or not) hiatus. Although she’s stepped away from podcasting several times, she never truly podfaded, and has picked up the mic again in 2014.

Of course, we all love the “Today’s Sweater” segment, which is a essentially the story of a single handknit sweater: the yarn, the pattern, the changes in plans and modifications that were made during the knitting of it, and the repairs made after. But one of my personal favorite episodes is one of the earliest: Pulling a Geographic. I remember listening to the episode on a cold, rainy Northampton day during my last semester of college, knowing that I was about to have to leave my beloved school and go into the real world. That feeling of pulling up your life and moving elsewhere, into the unknown, was terrifying and exciting all at once, and the timing of the episode was perfect.

Connect Learning
I found Connect Learning early on in my podcast explorations, (possibly even earlier than Cover to Cover or Cast On–I remember listening to it on one bus trip to New York during spring semester 2005) at a time that I was really falling in love with museum education. There weren’t really any museum ed podcasts at the time (though there were some museum-based podcasts, primarily ones that served as either formal or informal audio tours), but I found my way to several interesting education podcasts. Of those, Connect Learning is the one I remember as having the biggest influence on me, and in fact, remains a major influence in how I think about technology and learning in a 21st century world. It is very much podfaded, but several episodes remain archived by the Internet Archive.

Scott Sigler’s podcast novels: Earthcore, Ancestor, and Infected
Scott Sigler was probably the very first author to see potential in podcasting a full length work of fiction, and he did it brilliantly, starting with Earthcore in 2005. As mentioned above, I found out about him via Cover to Cover, and listened to these first three novels as he released them in real time. They’re all great horror novels, and I highly recommend them, but I think in some ways, his real legacy is the entire mini-genre of podcast novels (including several others which will make it onto this list of mine.)

In two weeks: I pull a geographic of my own, move three times, and go through almost as many iPods.

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